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 Post subject: Advice a Hornet
 Post Posted: Sat Mar 03, 2018 6:25 pm 
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Newbie

Joined: Sat Feb 24, 2018 12:40 pm
Posts: 2
Hello guys,

I am Georgi, from Bulgaria and I am a huge fan of the Hornet since I was 15. I can finally afford one and decided to become a part of the Hornet family. I have read many articles about the Hornet (that is how I found out about this place) but still need some advice. Currently I am struggling with the choice of buying a first gen or second gen Hornet. I am aware that both bikes are superb and I would love to hear from you guys for pros and cons about each of them.

Furthermore, any information for a Hornet newbie will be greatly appreciated (what to look for when buying a used one, maintenance advice, etc... ).

Thank you in advance for your help and I can't wait to hearing from you guys.


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 Post subject: Re: Advice a Hornet
 Post Posted: Sat Mar 03, 2018 8:04 pm 
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Hornet Baby
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Joined: Sat Aug 20, 2016 6:39 pm
Posts: 31
Location: Lower Saxony, Germany
Hi Georgi,
this is Michael from Germany. Welcome to the board!
First of all, the Hornet (I guess we're talking about the 600?) is a reliable bike, fast and easy to handle, hassle-free and affordable.

I had a couple of them, built 98, 00 and 02, with and without fairing.

No major updates have been made to the engine, the only difference that has to be mentioned is the 16 inch front wheel until 1999.
The early gas tank has a capacity of 16 liters, but you won't be able to ride more than 200 kms until switching to reserve. From 2002, the capacity is 17 liters.

On the other hand, the PC36 has been produced in Italy instead of Japan. These models, recognizable by the Honda wing on the gas tank, have a quite poor painting quality. I had two 2002 bikes and the clear coating was so thin that the Honda stickers peeled off :eek

In my opinion, the best ones are the 2000/2001 bikes. They were still built in Japan, they are already equipped with the 17 inch front wheel and they still have the beautiful speedometer/tachometer housing. Or look for the CB600S, the one with the fairing. Faster, more economical and more comfortable.

I own the very early 1998 model and yes, the front wheel is a minor disadvantage. But, as I am not the one who's going to join the race track, that isn't a problem. The early Hornets are available for quite reasonable prices and I picked one in showroom condition with only 9500 kms.

_________________
Cheers,
Michael

1998 CB600F PC34
2003 CB900F SC48
2001 CB500S PC32
1981 XL185S L185S


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 Post subject: Re: Advice a Hornet
 Post Posted: Sat Mar 03, 2018 11:32 pm 
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Joined: Sat Feb 24, 2018 12:40 pm
Posts: 2
Hi Michael,

Thank you very much for the quick response.

Yes, I am referring to the Hornet 600. Unfortunately the few available here early models (2000-2001) are not in a very good condition. Currently I am thinking of getting a Hornet after 2006. I've read that they are with a fuel injection. A friend of mine told me that fuel injection models are more reliable and have better economy (does he have a point?).

Also do you know anything about the 2007+ model? Are they as good as the first Hornet?

Finally one thing that disturbs me. I am tall (190cm). I was told that I will not be comfortable for longer journeys. I did a small test (less than a kilometer) and it felt fairly comfortable. Is the Hornet tall people friendly?


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 Post subject: Re: Advice a Hornet
 Post Posted: Sun Mar 04, 2018 6:34 am 
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Hornet Baby
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Joined: Sat Aug 20, 2016 6:39 pm
Posts: 31
Location: Lower Saxony, Germany
Well, I don't know much about the PC41 series, which is the third generation (No. one: PC34, no. two: PC36).
I made a test ride some years ago, but I did not own that version.
It has 102 hp instead of 94-97 and is very easy to handle.

In general, the fuel injection is more user-friendly. You won't have to think about cold start issues and the bike will start right away after the winter. The fuel consumption should be the same according to tests, that means, about 5 liters per 100 km. But if something's going wrong with the fuel injection, most riders have to call a mechanic. For example, the Hornet 900 that I own has a pressure regulator that is prone to fail. That little @#%$ costs around 180 Euros and if the garage is not familiar with the fuel injection, they will think that you have an ignition problem because cylinder number two and three are misfiring. In some cases, owners spent 500 Euros for spark plugs, coils and so on without solving the problem.

So, while the injection is more reliable, the carburettors are bullet-proof and simple to maintenance. If you're riding frequently, you won't have any trouble with the carbs. What they don't like are long winters.

The PC41 is the only Hornet that could be found with the ABS.
But the real disadvantage about the PC41 is the ugly look *oops* (did I said that loud?)

I am only 178cm, so I can't judge about the rider's position for taller people. Perhaps you should be after the CB900F which is a little more "grown-up" (seat height is 795mm, bigger fuel tank) and has the desired injection. But that one's even more expensive and hasn't the ABS brake.

In Germany, prices for the PC34 starts at about 1200 EUR (for a wreck) and ends at 2800 EUR.
PC36 is 2200-3500 EUR. PC41 are 3000-5000 and SC48 (the Hornet 900) are available for 2200-4500 EUR.

_________________
Cheers,
Michael

1998 CB600F PC34
2003 CB900F SC48
2001 CB500S PC32
1981 XL185S L185S


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