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 Post Posted: Sun Jan 13, 2019 11:36 am 
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True Horneteer
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Interesting vid - especially for Mr Biggabit as he actually has a VFR! :D

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tt4iXRcwHeY


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 Post Posted: Tue Feb 05, 2019 8:08 pm 
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Liked that video. I've been lusting after VFRs for a while but can't afford or justify one right now!


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 Post Posted: Tue Feb 05, 2019 9:15 pm 
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anz243k wrote:
Liked that video. I've been lusting after VFRs for a while but can't afford or justify one right now!


Yeah, I love the sound and sophistication of that V4.

You can get a late 90's VFR (which some consider the best VFR) for surprisingly little money if you look around - if it's been maintained properly then higher than average mileages that a lot of VFRs have shouldn't be a problem.

The later V-TEC bikes with the sharper styling and underseat pipes can also be had for not much cash considering the quality of these motorcycles - possibly because the expensive and complicated valve clearance check on these bikes puts some people off and the way the v-tec systm clunks in and out of action at specific revs was criticised.


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 Post Posted: Wed Feb 06, 2019 7:12 pm 
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I might be increasing my commute soon so have been looking VFRs and ST1300s. I hadn't realised the Pan was a v4 until I started reading more

So I might be closer to that sexy sound!

If i was going for a VFR, it would definitely be the pre vtec version...if nothing else, purely for the looks!


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 Post Posted: Wed Feb 06, 2019 8:14 pm 
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Personally I would go for the late 90s VFR - often cited as one of the best motorcycles ever built in terms of do it all ability and fine engineering.


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 Post Posted: Wed Feb 06, 2019 9:49 pm 
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Victor Meldrew
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My mate has an immaculate 'R' reg VFR800, a year older than my Hornet. Sounds lovely.

Completely stock. When the exhaust manifolds rotted out, he had them replaced with an OEM Honda (mild steel) part, same with the reg rec when that went.

If it was mine, I'd be ditching the linked brakes, fitting new braided lines to replace the original :eek rubber hoses still on the bike, and upgrading the suspension, which must be very tired by now. And probably putting a can on it, although it does sound lovely on the stock system.

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 Post Posted: Thu Feb 07, 2019 10:16 am 
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Yeah - the late 90s VFRs are so highly regarded by their owners that they do tend to be 'keepers' and are often very well maintained as they rack up high mileages.

It's the kind of bike that justifies a total refurb at 50k miles in order to get another 50k out of it.

Yeah, I would definitely ditch the linked brakes - it seems that brands that manufacture cars as well as bikes like BMW and Honda let some of their car technology seep into their bikes - which in the case of linked brakes and V-Tec has attracted justified criticism.

Honda put so much work and investment in developing the V4 - the fifth generation bikes (98 to 01) motor came out of the RC45.


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 Post Posted: Thu Feb 07, 2019 9:58 pm 
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Have to say i love mine.... can't believe it's been that long since i

Image
Can't fault the brakes, handles brilliantly, headlights are great, decent tank range, all day comfort, does two up with ease and she sounds awesome.

From the VFR site regarding the brakes.

"Most people who slag off the linked brakes fall into a number of categories:-
1. A bike journalist who slags them off because other journalists do.
2. Someone who's read the article by a bike journo slagging the system off.
3. Someone who's never ridden a bike with linked brakes and is in fear of the unknown.
4. Someone who believes their road riding ability is superior to everyone elses, which is fine if your name is Mr V Rossi

I have every faith that there are are the odd few occasions where an unlinked system could be better than a linked system, but those cases would only be in an extreme condition. Those would be the sort of times where, for the vast majority of cases, and average rider is heading to the scene of a potential crash no matter what the hydraulic set up of the brakes. Given the litigious nature of product liability in the US, if it were dangerous Honda would have been sued in a big spectacular fashion.
The VFR 800s brakes were tested by PB mag against a couple of sports bikes R1,R6, an split the pair of them.

Yes full on they are good."


Below: well worth a watch.


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 Post Posted: Fri Feb 08, 2019 10:05 am 
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Victor Meldrew
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To be fair, my reservation about the linked brakes has nothing whatever to do with actually riding the bike. It's simply that all those pipes and things appears to be a maintenance nightmare, much simpler to just have a total of three brake hoses like the Hornet. I notice that your bike appears to be still on the original brake hoses ?

My mate reckons it's a dealer job to bleed the brakes or change the brake fluid. I couldn't put up with that.

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 Post Posted: Fri Feb 08, 2019 11:29 am 
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Hornet Lord
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richard pitman wrote:
My mate reckons it's a dealer job to bleed the brakes or change the brake fluid. I couldn't put up with that.


Nah, my mate flushed it himself at home without issue. I imagine a refill from dry would be a total PITA though.

We looked into removing the linkage when he first bought the bike but unfortunately there is much more to it than just blanking some pipes.

Generally he has no complaints about the linked brakes, after all it's just linked front to rear so you can still trail brake. Only time it became an issue was on a track day. Linked brakes isn't great when you have your rear wheel in air going into a corner, maybe the ABS version would have helped there.


Last edited by knee_jerk on Fri Feb 08, 2019 11:38 am, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post Posted: Fri Feb 08, 2019 11:32 am 
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True Horneteer
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Quote:
From the VFR site regarding the brakes.


Beautiful Viffer! :angel

Regarding the linked brakes - I fall into the categories you describe - I've never ridden a bike with linked brakes so have relied on the second hand opinions of bike journos - but as a VFR owner if you say they are good I'll take your word for it :D


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 Post Posted: Fri Feb 08, 2019 11:37 am 
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Hornet Lord
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Last year I swapped bikes with my mate and did one of my favourite rides. I had never ridden his Vtec for that long before, this was for over an hour and I really settled into it and liked how it handled, it was so easy to flick into corners and power out of them it felt like cheating!
That evening I was on autotrader teasing myself. :angel

Having just bought a bike (last year) there is no chance of me getting another without first selling one, and neither of my roadies are going anywhere anytime soon... :love
So I guess we'll have to move house to get one with a bigger garage. :)


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 Post Posted: Fri Feb 08, 2019 7:06 pm 
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richard pitman wrote:
To be fair, my reservation about the linked brakes has nothing whatever to do with actually riding the bike. It's simply that all those pipes and things appears to be a maintenance nightmare, much simpler to just have a total of three brake hoses like the Hornet. I notice that your bike appears to be still on the original brake hoses ?


They are indeed the original hoses and the brakes feel firm and sharp, so i don't feel the need to upgrade. Regards de-linking... IMO it's really not worth the effort given how well the system works, but should one desire it there are de-linking kits available and many forum threads on the various methods.

richard pitman wrote:
My mate reckons it's a dealer job to bleed the brakes or change the brake fluid. I couldn't put up with that.


I wonder which dealer told him that! Is this the same mate who asked for your help to fit a new drive chain? My point is (and there's nothing wrong with it) that some folk lack the confidence to take a job on, in which case its probably best left to the dealer or someone who's done it before.

I'm no expert but my 'spannering' history includes drive chains, steering head races, valve clearances, caliper rebuilds, fork seals, exhaust headers removal, wheel bearings and tyre fitting. No doubt for some 'best left to the dealer.' Richard- you would have no problem bleeding a dual system.

I changed my Viffer's brake fluid last summer (Did the clutch circuit the same day) with no problems whatsoever. There is of course a correct procedure to follow (as there is with a valve clearance check) and this can be found in the Haynes or on a VFR forum.

My biggest worry was getting brake fluid on my lovely fairings! The brake reservoir is levelled by turning the bars full to the left (Clutch res full to the right) this places the open reservoir directly over shiny body work! Even with both the main side panels removed there's still an awful lot of nose and tail body work one might accidentally contaminate.

P.s. Haynes give the job a 3 spanner rating. (Bleeding the CBS brakes)

/// Fairly difficult,
Suitable for competent
DIY mechanic

Where as overhauling a caliper a 4 spanner rating. (I've replaced the Hornet caliper seals many times)

//// Difficult, suitable for
Experienced DIY
mechanic

So no where near the 5 spanner - ///// Expert DIY or professional.
:)

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 Post Posted: Sat Feb 16, 2019 2:57 pm 
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Victor Meldrew
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Quote:
Is this the same mate who asked for your help to fit a new drive chain?


It is, and despite me itching to get on with it, we still haven't got around to it. He's the one who got a dealer to fit a genuine Honda mild steel manifold, rather than the stainless one which I would cheerfully have helped him to fit.

( He's another retired bloke like me, but unlike me he insists in filling his diary up with attending meetings at umpteen different societies, being a treasurer, unpaid computer geek etc etc, never has time for the things that really matter, ie spannering motor bikes. Back in the day, as a single chap, he was into swapping car engines, so not as though he lacks the ability, just the time and inclination … )


Quote:
They are indeed the original hoses and the brakes feel firm and sharp, so i don't feel the need to upgrade


OK. I thought rubber hoses had a service life of 3 - 5 years. Might be OK on the outside, and flaky on the inside. 8o

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And then one day you find
Ten years have got behind you
No one told you when to run
You missed the starting gun


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 Post Posted: Sun Mar 03, 2019 11:51 pm 
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Victor Meldrew
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Had an email from my chum this evening. His 20 year old ? ( R reg ) VFR still has the original rubber hoses. He'd just looked up the price of a set of new ones, and was a bit taken aback to find that it would be 300 quid or so. At first, I doubted that, but just looking on Ebay that seems to be the going rate. Unless anyone knows different.

Although, on reflection, that's only the price of a pair of tyres or a couple of trips to Tesco ..

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And then one day you find
Ten years have got behind you
No one told you when to run
You missed the starting gun


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 Post Posted: Mon Mar 04, 2019 7:43 pm 
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£300 for a pair of tyres? what are you using?!! £170 a pair from site - Fit your own (like i do) and that's all you'll pay. :angel

Due to the number of brake lines (10 i think) it does get expensive, if i ever replace mine i'l probably go with have used them on the Hornet with no issues.

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 Post Posted: Tue Mar 05, 2019 10:24 am 
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Victor Meldrew
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Well, it does depend which pair of tyres we are talking about, but I guess I did exaggerate a bit. :lol

I do buy tyres online and fit them myself to the 175s, but draw the line at attempting tubeless on the Hornet. Anyway, current set of Michelin Road tyres on that will need replacing due to age rather than wear at the mileages that bike is currently doing, lucky if it does 1K / annum.

10 brake lines, yikes, that explains the price, I just imagined maybe 3 or 4 more than the Hornet.

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And then one day you find
Ten years have got behind you
No one told you when to run
You missed the starting gun


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