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 Post subject: Welding
 Post Posted: Tue Jan 08, 2019 6:20 pm 
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Victor Meldrew
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At the latter end of 2018, I suffered from an impulse buy, and picked up a cheap MMA inverter welder ( stick or arc welder ) in Aldi. Over the next few weeks, I bought some safety gear, auto dimming helmet, welding gauntlets etc, also a selection of welding rods. Then left it all in the shed.

Today, plucked up courage, plugged it in and had a go. Managed to stick a couple of bits of mild steel together, then had a go at some stainless steel, using stainless rods. Crap welds, but the actual process was not as scary as I'd thought it would be, and it didn't blow all the fuses in the house or burn the shed down. MMA uses coated rods, that leave nasty slag all over welds. Tig welding looks too difficult to learn straight off, which is a pity, as that seems to be the method of choice,

And then I remembered that Machine Mart had sent me one of their VAT free weekend offers, expired last Sunday. Tried it online anyway, still worked, so I now have a mig welder on the way, supposed to be able to stick stainless together using appropriate gas and wire, and be easy for a novice to use. We'll see …

( I want to build a better silencer box for my CL175 )

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 Post subject: Re: Welding
 Post Posted: Tue Jan 08, 2019 8:21 pm 
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True Horneteer
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Can we expect a Pitman Trellis Frame Honda 400 Special for January 2020? :angel

Seriously though - that sounds excellent - if you can get nifty with the Mig all kinds of interesting possibilities await you. :D


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 Post subject: Re: Welding
 Post Posted: Wed Jan 09, 2019 10:06 am 
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Victor Meldrew
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Quote:
all kinds of interesting possibilities await you


Third degree burns, electrocution, blindness, plenty to look forward to .. :lol

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 Post subject: Re: Welding
 Post Posted: Wed Jan 09, 2019 11:51 am 
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True Horneteer
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Quote:
Third degree burns, electrocution,


Sounds like a great night out! :angel


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 Post subject: Re: Welding
 Post Posted: Wed Jan 09, 2019 10:35 pm 
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richard pitman wrote:
Quote:
all kinds of interesting possibilities await you


Third degree burns, electrocution, blindness, plenty to look forward to .. :lol




Not as though you'll be doing it for a living... so you probably won't get 'welders lung' :)

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 Post subject: Re: Welding
 Post Posted: Sat Jan 12, 2019 9:53 am 
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Victor Meldrew
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Sometimes mail order isn't the best way of buying things. :(

The 80 amp Aldi arc welder is a neat little thing, not much bigger than a shoebox. In fact, I brought it home on the back of the bike. The Machine Mart 90 amp mig welder turned up yesterday. In the photos on the webpage it looked much like the Aldi, neat little blue box.

I was in for a surprise. :eek

In the flesh, it is a massive thing, weighing 25kg, which if I'd read the online specs properly I would have been aware of. Spent the rest of the afternoon making space in the shed for it. :Bang

And to add to my grief, the package that came with it was supposed to contain my additional order of welding wire and gas, actually contained a workshop vice, intended for some chap in Scotland. Still waiting for MM to get back to me on that one. :evil :Bang :Bang :Bang

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 Post subject: Re: Welding
 Post Posted: Sun Jan 13, 2019 10:59 am 
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On the other hand you could say that it's reassuringly large and heavy and obviously the genuine item as opposed to some kind of mickey mouse/fisher price lightweight imitation.


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 Post subject: Re: Welding
 Post Posted: Sat Jan 19, 2019 6:59 pm 
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With all those beautiful restoration examples on your It felt sacrilegious posting pictures of a dirty old radiator, so i'll continue here. :) (I've collapsed the pics)

After watching (who makes it look very easy indeed) i couldn't resist having a play, and on first attempt managed to deposit a nice bead along the edge of a piece of scrap aluminium.

Image
First try and i'm pleased with the results.. the bead runs actually on the top edge - lengthening the piece.

With the scrap piece clamped vertically; a pencil torch was passed back and forth just below the top edge until the Allum-rod would melt on contact with the scrap piece. The trick is to heat the part and not the Alum-rod

I do have a full size propane torch, but am hoping to get away with using the pencil torch for a more precision repair and less paint loss to the surrounding areas. This will obviously depend on heat dissipation. Although having said that and if i do manage a repair, before re-fitting i'm going to clean it up and respray it.

There's no rush; as when i got the leak i purchased a second hand OM radiator with fan from Ebay for £65 (currently fitted to the bike) The Ebay item does not leak and it's fan unit is in better condition but the fins between the radiator cores have suffered more damage. where as the original rad's fins are almost all in perfect condition.

Hadn't thought of restoring the original rad until i'd removed the fan and realised the over all good condition of it.

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 Post subject: Re: Welding
 Post Posted: Sun Jan 20, 2019 12:48 pm 
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Victor Meldrew
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It looks as though you are having more luck than this guy, over on the Honda Twins website:

https://www.hondatwins.net/forums/1-project-logs/122806-anyone-ever-use-muggyweld.html

Thread does have some helpful comments from a chap who successfully used Lumiweld.

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 Post subject: Re: Welding
 Post Posted: Sun Jan 20, 2019 1:46 pm 
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Well mine was a very small piece of scrap :angel

I think the trouble with a crankcase cover is it's heat sink properties, over heating to off set the thermal transfer rate would be a real risk and constant battle. i wonder whether pre heating the whole part in an oven (gas mark 9 would be 245 °C) would help slow rate of thermal loss from the target are

Trouble then would be the danger in handing a 200+ degree part! :fried

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 Post subject: Re: Welding
 Post Posted: Thu Jan 24, 2019 1:17 am 
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Victor Meldrew
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I got the Clarke mig welder assembled yesterday, and had a go at laying some practice beads on a piece of 1.5mm mild steel plate.

Very pleased and relieved to find that it was easy to produce a continuous bead of weld, something that I've so far not been able to do with the arc welder.

OK, first attempts probably best described as chicken poo, but I reckon that the last bead, bottom right in the pic below, stands up fairly well to scrutiny. Pulled left to right, a bit wobbly at first, but by the end looking quite good.

Image

Now to change the gas and wire so that I can try it on stainless steel.

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 Post subject: Re: Welding
 Post Posted: Fri Jan 25, 2019 2:46 pm 
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Victor Meldrew
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As in other thread, stainless welding is being learnt.

It's going to be useful for small jobs. Here's a little mounting bracket I've just knocked up, to be welded to the side of an exhaust can.

Image Image

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 Post subject: Re: Welding
 Post Posted: Mon Feb 25, 2019 10:39 am 
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Victor Meldrew
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Did a bit of welding practice yesterday.

One of the exercises in my 'How to Weld' book consists of cutting six equal sized squares of steel plate, then welding these together to make a cube. I had a go at this, but decided to elaborate a bit, by cutting holes in each face, bit of modern art.

Still bliimin difficult, I basically can't see what I'm doing, the auto dimming helmet goes so black when the arc is struck. Flap wheel in the grinder tidies things up, but I'm going to have another go now, see if I can get a solid bead along all the edges.

Image

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 Post subject: Re: Welding
 Post Posted: Mon Feb 25, 2019 9:08 pm 
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That will never holed water :angel

Here's one for you Richard :rollin

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 Post subject: Re: Welding
 Post Posted: Mon Feb 25, 2019 9:29 pm 
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Victor Meldrew
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Lol ! Some people ….

Mind you, I can't talk. Cutting those round holes, started off using a hole saw mounted in my pillar drill. It was taking ages, drill kept digging in and stalling the motor. So, I decided to put the hole saw into my ridiculously powerful corded drill, holding the square of steel horizontally in the jaws of a workmate ( bench, not person ).

Went really well, drilled first five plates in no time. And then on the last one, the holesaw snagged in the metal. Instead of stalling the motor as with the pillar drill, my vicious power drill nearly broke my wrist as it tore itself from my grasp and went flying off. Torque applied to plate was sufficient to bend it into an S shape. Lucky to escape without injury. :eek

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 Post subject: Re: Welding
 Post Posted: Tue Feb 26, 2019 9:25 am 
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True Horneteer
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Were you using cutting oil with the hole saw?


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 Post subject: Re: Welding
 Post Posted: Tue Feb 26, 2019 10:29 am 
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Victor Meldrew
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Hangs head in shame …

On the drill press I did give it a squirt of 10/40 from my oil can, but using the hand held drill, nope. It just flings every where, messy. I do know that all the gurus state that cutting oil should be used whenever drilling, cutting or tapping, I just never bother.

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 Post subject: Re: Welding
 Post Posted: Tue Feb 26, 2019 10:38 am 
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I had to cut 8mm mild steel with a pillar drill hole saw combo - it was very heavy going and pushed my cheapo domestic pillar drill to the limit - the hole saw got very hot and frequently jammed when I put to much pressure on the drill press - so for me the cutting oil was an absolute must - it definitely kept the temperature down, saved the hole saw from wearing out and helped with the actual cutting process.


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 Post subject: Re: Welding
 Post Posted: Tue Feb 26, 2019 6:13 pm 
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I looked into 'cutting fluids' when playing with my 'Aldi tap and die set' and apparently you can't beat animal fats. (Sorry vegans)

A few observations:

By far the best coolant is water.
The best coolant that is also the best cutting fluid is Trichloroethane.

Neither is acceptable. Water promotes rust. Trichlor can and will kill you if misused in any number of ways including sudden untreatable liver failure.

Everything else is a compromise. Some cut well (oils) but are very poor coolants (oils). Some cool well (water mix synthetics) but aren't the best for cutting (same). Some produce noxious fumes, some don't.

It changes quite a bit in the home shop too. Here the first consideration is smell and smoke. Regardless of what I use it better not stink up the house.

The HSM is also usually constrained by mess and by cost. Safety is also a concern. This precludes the use of many of the commercial lubricoolants. Not many HMS's have flood coolant systems. The majority of commercial lubricoolants are intended for use as flood coolants. Many are now biodegradable which means they won't keep well. Without constant aeration anaerobic bacteria will grow and make a smelly mess.

Lard based oils have been around since machining began and are safe, reasonably clean and can be used sparingly with manual application. Many of the cutting oils available are actually still based on lard oil. It isn't called that but the main ingredient in lard that gives it superior cutting qualities is a type of fatty molecule called an olefin. In the case of lard oil the particular olefin is Oleic Acid which is responsible for the cutting qualities of the oil. It is non toxic, not easily ignited, non corrosive and doesn't smell bad. It is not WHMIS controlled and doesn't require a MSDS.

To dilute it use either Stoddard solvent (white spirits) or WD-40 (or similar). Both have a flash point that is over 100F and so do not present an explosion hazard at room temperature.



But never engine oil...

As another post said, motor oil has been extensively developed to keep two metal surfaces from touching. It will do its best to keep your tool bit from touching the work. I once borrowed a Sunnen cylinder hone and spent hours and hours and hours honing a cylinder in an engine. I asked Hans Fisher, who was one of the Sunnen honing gurus, why it took so long. He had a good laugh at my expense, then explained that by using motor oil that I had around, I had picked about the worst possible lubricant. Then he gave me some Sunnen honing oil. I hope I have learned a little in the ensuing 50 years, but I am still learning about cutting oils. What I do know is that motor oil isn't.



So the statement 'any lube is better than no lube' is quite incorrect. 8o

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 Post subject: Re: Welding
 Post Posted: Tue Feb 26, 2019 8:32 pm 
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Victor Meldrew
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There's a bloke who writes for Motorcycle Mechanics, ( bit of a knob IMHO ), he swears by this stuff:

https://uk.rs-online.com/web/p/products/2394852/?grossPrice=Y&cm_mmc=UK-PLA-DS3A-_-google-_-PLA_UK_EN_Facilities_Cleaning_And_Maintenance-_-Greases_And_Oils_And_Lubricants%7CCutting_Fluids-_-PRODUCT_GROUP&matchtype=&pla-392461798929&s_kwcid=AL!7457!3!243845746270!!!g!392461798929!&gclid=Cj0KCQiA5NPjBRDDARIsAM9X1GIvFGehP72uwQnMDVg3GAJ02rGS-Jguy_cbBQpRsjWKdwrtOnMZuHYaAht-EALw_wcB&gclsrc=aw.ds

Bit expensive for 400ml, that'd buy a few drill bits and hacksaw blades ….

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 Post subject: Re: Welding
 Post Posted: Mon Jul 01, 2019 8:45 pm 
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Victor Meldrew
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We went to the Prescott Bike Fest the other weekend, and while I was there I spotted a cheap top box on one of the stands, bought it on impulse. I'm not a fan of top boxes, but they are useful, I always had one back in the day when the bike was my sole transport. And now I've got three bikes on the road, doesn't hurt to spoil the aesthetics of one of them 8o

Anyway, got it home and wondered how to fit it. Back in the day, rear carrier racks were easily available but they are like hens teeth these days. So I got the mig welder out. First attempt used 4mm thick 30mm wide mild steel strip, and I was amazed at how easy this stuff is to weld, compared with 1mm sheet steel. Just turn the welder to max and blast away.

First attempt:

Image

Image

Finished product very stiff and strong, but weighed a ton, over engineered for the job at hand. So I had another go, using 3mm x 20mm steel strip, and here it is !


Image

Image

Image

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 Post subject: Re: Welding
 Post Posted: Tue Jul 02, 2019 9:01 am 
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Bravo! :clap


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