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 Post Posted: Tue May 29, 2018 11:21 am 
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Hello! Since I'm going to take the A2 licence I need to focus on the 1998-2002 models (the others can't be used on A2).
So these bikes are definitely going to show some age.
There are quite a few of them here in Sweden actually and they cost around £1700. They have in general run pretty far 50000 km or 30000 miles is the usual. Will this be a problem?

From what I've heard the engines are rock solid except for the cam chain tensioner but I'm thinking more about worn suspension and such. I've also understood most people change the rear and front suspension for better?

I would like to get as many tips as possible.

Thanks :)


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 Post Posted: Tue May 29, 2018 12:35 pm 
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Hi

The 1998-99 bikes have a 16inch front wheel which limits tyre choice, so it's probably best to go for a 2000 and onward model.

You can fit a 17inch wheel to the 98/99 bikes but it's an expensive mod as you will need a '2000 onward' wheel and tyre plus a pair of '2000 onward' discs. (98/99 discs won't fit the 17inch wheel due to bolt hole alignment) 8o

Presuming you intend on fitting NEW brake discs (recommended) you're looking at spending at least £400+ money that you could spend elsewhere, such as on mono shock with adjustable damping and a bespoke spring rate. :love

Read here ?

The 98/99 models also have a slightly different steering geometry set in the triples (rake and trail) which combined with the 16 inch front wheel make the bike steer quicker but also less stable. I've never had a problem with this (other than the odd head shake when accelerating hard) but intrigued as to what difference it makes i swapped the top and bottom yoke (Triple trees) for a set from a 2000+ model when i last replaced the steering head bearings. :blahblah



I do have a 17 inch wheel which i managed to purchase in great condition and for a good price but i just can't justify spending £300 on discs when i still haven't done the shock uprade. :o

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 Post Posted: Tue May 29, 2018 6:55 pm 
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Needs to get out more!
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Yeah, the Hornet is a pretty solid bike, the CBR engine has a good reputation for reliability and longevity assuming it has been maintained properly.

The regulator rectifier like a lot of Hondas can fail - but this is an easy fix so nothing to worry about.

There are no serious flaws or weak points with this bike - apart from the suspension which will benefit from a refresh/upgrade.

The bike is a lot of fun to ride - it's a great handling street bike but also has the power and speed to satisfy on faster roads :D


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 Post Posted: Fri Jun 01, 2018 7:07 pm 
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Proud owner of a '98 (16") hornet with 60k miles on it... still going strong :)

I have gone through 2 rear shocks on it in that time - must be doing something wrong :D

All round solid bike, commutable in town, comfy on the motorway, and fun in the twisties - great all-rounder!


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 Post Posted: Fri Jun 01, 2018 7:35 pm 
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spaceboy_uk wrote:
Proud owner of a '98 (16") hornet with 60k miles on it... still going strong :)
I have gone through 2 rear shocks on it in that time - must be doing something wrong :D


If you mean the Showa OEM shock which is shite from new... what you're doing wrong is replacing with OEM :Bang

Hey spaceboy_uk... given you're running a 16 inch front (like myself) what's you're choice of tyres? My bike had Maxi's on it when i got it but have been using conti sport attacks ever since.

Can't fault them :)

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 Post Posted: Fri Jun 01, 2018 7:48 pm 
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Biggabit wrote:
If you mean the Showa OEM shock which is shite from new... what you're doing wrong is replacing with OEM :Bang

Hey spaceboy_uk... given you're running a 16 inch front (like myself) what's you're choice of tyres? My bike had Maxi's on it when i got it but have been using conti sport attacks ever since.

Can't fault them :)


That must be it - that shock seems to "work" but not much else...

I used to use BT010/020, then 012 (I think) but that was years back before my bike was garaged for 8 years due to lack of funds/energy and having 2 kids... long story :D
Got it back on the road last autumn and plumbed for a BT016... been somewhat out of the loop but I was always really happy with the old BTxxx dual-compound, lots of confidence in the wet, and good balance of grip/feel and longevity.


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 Post Posted: Fri Jun 01, 2018 8:29 pm 
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So changing the shock is a must on a high mileage bike?
Is there anything wrong with the 16 inch front wheel on the 98-99?


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 Post Posted: Fri Jun 01, 2018 8:31 pm 
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Irongamer727 wrote:
So changing the shock is a must on a high mileage bike?
Is there anything wrong with the 16 inch front wheel on the 98-99?


Nothing wrong with it at all :)

Some people might consider the 16" to be a little quick to turn, and not as "stable" as the 17"... however I've
a) not compared the two
b) never had a problem or concern

As Biggabit says, it does limit tyre choice as not many 16" are made these days - but there's still good rubber such as the 016 I recently put on.


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 Post Posted: Fri Jun 01, 2018 8:48 pm 
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spaceboy_uk wrote:
Biggabit wrote:
If you mean the Showa OEM shock which is shite from new... what you're doing wrong is replacing with OEM :Bang

Hey spaceboy_uk... given you're running a 16 inch front (like myself) what's you're choice of tyres? My bike had Maxi's on it when i got it but have been using conti sport attacks ever since.

Can't fault them :)


That must be it - that shock seems to "work" but not much else...

I used to use BT010/020, then 012 (I think) but that was years back before my bike was garaged for 8 years due to lack of funds/energy and having 2 kids... long story :D
Got it back on the road last autumn and plumbed for a BT016... been somewhat out of the loop but I was always really happy with the old BTxxx dual-compound, lots of confidence in the wet, and good balance of grip/feel and longevity.


Yeah i did the same, i replaced the goosed original red spring Showa shock with a brand new white spring OEM shock from that Italian seller on Ebay (Think it cost £60) Anyway at the time i thought it felt better (probably psychological) but whether it was or not... it's definitely a 'pogo stick' now.

So this time (and I've had the funds for quite some time now) i'm going to purchase a rebuild-able one with adjustable damping and most importantly (so I've read) a spring rate to match my weight when all geared up. :mic

As for tyres i think i'l stick with the Conti's as i can't fault them. They probably don't last as long as some but seeing as i i save £30 a pair (£15 a wheel around these parts) So not too bothered on longevity :)

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 Post Posted: Mon Jun 04, 2018 9:00 pm 
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I changed to a 17" front for better tyre choices.

On 16", worst tyres were the original fit Michelin HiSports, totally lethal in the cold and wet, how they got away with fitting these to an entry level bike is beyond me.

Best 16" for me were BT010. I wasn't so happy on the stiffer BT014 tyres that followed. I also tried a pair of Avon AV39/40 tyres that were very grippy ( as if I could tell :ahhdiddums ), but wore out in no time at all.

Onto 17" wheels and Dunlop RoadSmart all weather touring tyres, followed by current Michelin Pilot Road 3 tyres. At the time of fitting, I was still using the bike for commuting. As it only goes out on sunny days now, maybe I should change for something sportier, but then again, would I really notice ?

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 Post Posted: Mon Jun 04, 2018 11:08 pm 
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I've seen people running the silencer on the side of the bike, it looks really clean I must say. Anyone here that have done it?


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 Post Posted: Fri Jul 06, 2018 7:40 pm 
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Guys how much work is it to change to a 17 inch wheel from a 16 inch?


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 Post Posted: Fri Jul 06, 2018 9:40 pm 
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Once you have the parts, it's a straight swap, as simple as taking one wheel out and putting new one in.

Original wheel spindle and spacers reused, same goes for brake calipers and front mudguard, rolling radius of 17" rubber same as 16" with its higher profile (70) tyre.

Obviously need the correct disks. I used a Firestorm wheel with disks from the faired Hornet. Other combos would work, just stating what worked for me.

Off topic, but possibly of interest. Triumph Street Triple 675 calipers are identical to the Hornet twin pot sliding calipers, and can often be picked up almost new, cheaper than rebuilding the original calipers. I've done this, and I'm sure the brakes feel more powerful, probably all in my mind as the parts appear identical.

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 Post Posted: Fri Jul 06, 2018 9:42 pm 
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Irongamer727 wrote:
Guys how much work is it to change to a 17 inch wheel from a 16 inch?


Faqs and how to section.



It's just a matter of cost really... about £400 assuming you buy new discs (Not Chinese cheese)

Wheel
New discs (16" disc won't fit 17" wheel)
New tyre
Air

8o

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 Post Posted: Sat Jul 07, 2018 8:17 am 
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Thanks a lot guys, btw I rode my very first hornet yesterday.
Currently running 125s, so it was something different
:)


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 Post Posted: Sat Jul 07, 2018 5:40 pm 
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I may be a bit odd but I really like the 16" front wheel on my 98 model. I love the way it 'falls' into corners with little or no effort. I have never had the head wobble in hard acceleration but maybe I haven't accelerated hard enough yet. :lol


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