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 Post Posted: Fri Jul 17, 2015 10:18 pm 
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Just bought a pair of Conti Sport Attacks from Oponeo to replace the pair I have on my 99 Hornet, well worth a look, very competitively priced with fast delivery (3 days).

Was tempted to try another brand of tyre but these warm up quick, grip well in wet and dry conditions and seem to wear well enough for my style of riding. (Daily 40 mile commute and some weekend scratching)

Have a browse, buy with confidence and if you fit them yourselves (like I do) you'll be quids in!
Though I must admit that I do have the luxury of having a second pair of (black) wheels for the bike (only one set of disks though) so I can fit the tyres at leisure then simply swap wheels over.

Next job is to powder coat the wheels gold they're already gold but tatty now... 4 wheels doesn't always = "cager" in my case it = no downtime :D

Ride safe.

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 Post Posted: Wed Mar 23, 2016 11:47 am 
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Hornet Lord
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Biggabit wrote:
Jand if you fit them yourselves (like I do) you'll be quids in!


How do you do this - have you done a guide?

I've got basic tools plus do my own MX tyres which are tough buggers so you need the nack. :evil

I've also got one of these which certainly helps, if only to hold the wheel still!

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 Post Posted: Wed Mar 23, 2016 5:34 pm 
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Hornet Baby

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Yes me too. I just ordered a new set from them and they arrived pretty sharpish. I am also waiting to change them as i am getting the wheels powder coated too. Got all the bearing sets ready to go, just need time to do it. my local bike shop changes my tyres for £10 so I will let them do it. I bought the Bridgestones for mine.


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 Post Posted: Wed Mar 23, 2016 8:07 pm 
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Hornet Baby

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I recently bought a tyre from Oponeo, it was slightly cheaper than Tyre Leader (another decent supplier), my tyre arrived in 3 days and was shipped from Germany. Had mine fitted at a local bike garage for £20 including getting rid of the old one.

Pete.


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 Post Posted: Wed Mar 23, 2016 11:18 pm 
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knee_jerk wrote:
Biggabit wrote:
and if you fit them yourselves (like I do) you'll be quids in!


How do you do this - have you done a guide?

I've got basic tools plus do my own MX tyres which are tough buggers so you need the nack. :evil

I've also got one of these which certainly helps, if only to hold the wheel still!

Image


It's not that hard and certainly doable if you prep things before hand, also do a search on 'you tube' for DIY Motorcycle tyre fitting as there are various methods and techniques. There are also various DIY tyre fitting machines one can knock up which might be of particular interest to you! (Google and you tube that one) :D

Anyway this is the way I did mine... My front brake disks are not present when I fit my tyres as I have two sets of wheels that I rotate and I'd advise removing yours if this is your first attempt.

To break the bead. (Again Youtube the various DIY methods others employ)

With front wheel adequately supported on two suitable beams of wood, and a piece of rubber mat laid on top of the rim and tyre to protect the rim from any possible scuffing, I lined up a spade close to rim and stood on it. As the bead gives way the rubber mat prevents the spade contacting the rim. I think I used a helper (daughter) to place a foot on the opposite end of the wheel to stop it from flipping up.

This method might sound dodgy but does the job (well at least it does on the front sadly it never worked on the rear)

I broke the rear bead by rigging up a couple of bits of wood and a car scissor jack between two brick walls (in the house passage way 3ft width approx) Basically with the wheel stood up against the wall (used a piece cardboard sheet to protect wheel from wall) then it was simply a case of laying the jack on floor and against the other wall and aligning a piece of two by three between tyre bead and jack then crank the handle! (Again it sounds dodgy but worked fine)

With old tyres removed I gave the bead seats a thougher clean removing any old bits of rubber residue ect (If you use a garage to fit your tyres make sure they do this or you'll end up with an annoying slow leak. (Garages tend to skip this simple task)

Prepping and fitting the new tyres...

Did mine during the hot weather we had last year, so before attempting to fit I left the tyres in the car for a couple of hours to warm up. (They really are too stiff cold)

With the rim suitably lubricated one side of the tyre just pops on by hand the other side needs to be worked on gradually with the tyre levers. The real trick is that if 12 o'clock is the last bit of bead your trying to lever on, then at six o'clock BOTH the beads MUST sit in the deep well of the wheel and not where they would normally seat. This so that you have all available slack, If this isn't the case you WILL STRUGGLE.

To reliably achieve this, (after popping the one side on) I used 4 large tie-wraps to keep the 7,6 and 5 o'clock section of the tyre beads together so that they would stay in the deep recess of the wheel, while I concentrated on levering the 12 o'clock section on.

Hope the above makes sense and you can visualise it, as it is KEY.

Like you're probably aware having fitted tyres on your trial bike ,if you're using too much force something is wrong, so stop and figure before you hurt yourself or damage something.

Bead seating was very simple to do using the local fuel garage air supply (two pops and you're done)

I balanced the wheels using a wheel balancer which i set up on a couple of old stereo speakers.

Tools required. (some more essential than others)

Nice piece of old carpet to work on.
Blocks of wood.
Thick pair of old jeans (you'll be surprised how much you use your knees doing this)

Tyre levers, no longer than 15 inches (I have two sets 15 and 12 but used the 12 inch pair)
Plastic rim protectors. (At least 3)
Tyre soap is best (though can use your own slippery solution)
Very large tie-wraps.
Wheel balancer.

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 Post Posted: Thu Mar 24, 2016 11:47 am 
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Some good ideas there Biggabit, especially ;

"Did mine during the hot weather we had last year, so before attempting to fit I left the tyres in the car for a couple of hours to warm up. (They really are too stiff cold) "

That makes one hell of a difference, as I found out when I did mine, 8o

Last time I broke my tyre bead I jacked up the rear of my Honda CR-V put the bike wheel under the rear tow bar , placed 4x2 wood below tow bar and onto the bead , and lowered the car down , pop,,, worked a treat :angel

I may try your scissor jack method next though, as I have a 40ft trek with a 3 ton trolley jack to the car :rollin

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 Post Posted: Thu Mar 24, 2016 1:14 pm 
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First thing I thought when I read about the scissor jack is if I tried that here I'd probably collapse the garage wall, or at least punch a few bricks out. :)

As I suspected..., it seems a hell of a lot of effort... if a local place will fit, balance and maybe even dispose for £10 a wheel I'll probably take them up on that offer. :angel


Last edited by knee_jerk on Thu Mar 24, 2016 2:15 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post Posted: Thu Mar 24, 2016 1:25 pm 
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knee_jerk wrote:
As I suspected..., it seems a hell of a lot of effort... if a local place will fit, balance and maybe even dispose for £10 a wheel I'll probably take them up on that offer. :angel


my thoughts exactly :clap :clap thats what i do :angel

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 Post Posted: Thu Mar 24, 2016 2:23 pm 
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Hornet Lord
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I was hoping Biggabit was going to say it's easy..., but he didn't... :cry

For my other bike the tyres are tubed so a little easier to deal with, plus with punctures you really need to be able to fix them yourself whilst out riding. With the road bike I'm not going to go through many tyres (or have punctures hopefully) so I can't really justify buying specific kit to do the balancing etc, though I think I have enough kit already to get the old tyres off & probably the new ones on..

I'm going to make some enquiries to see how much the local places will charge, however if it's as much £20 each then I may do it myself anyway. :evil


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 Post Posted: Thu Mar 24, 2016 2:36 pm 
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Down south its nearly £40 to change a pair of tyres out , that's nearly 50% of a pair of tyres themselves that I buy , :Bang

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 Post Posted: Thu Mar 24, 2016 4:39 pm 
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Victor Meldrew
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I've bought sticky road tyres for the monkey bike from Oponeo, good price and quick delivery. Easy to change those tyres as I had split rims on the monkey.

Image

For the 175, I used National Bike Tyres, again good prices and quick delivery. No problem changing these myself, just like big push bike tyres really.

Image

But I'm afraid for the Hornet, tyres changed every three years or so, it's left to local dealer. They charge the same for loose wheels as on the bike, so these days I just drop the bike in, then read the paper in Costa until its ready. That said, that is the ONLY job a dealer has ever done on my Hornet, bar its first service from new.

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 Post Posted: Thu Mar 24, 2016 6:22 pm 
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I'll have to price up the options carefully...
I know if I start down the route of fitting myself there will be lots of swearing but I'm confident I'll get there.

I know it seems like not a lot of money to get them fitted (compared to the potential grief of home fitting) but I'm not a born & bred South Westener... I'm a Yorkshireman and as such I have certain standards of cheapskate to live up to. :angel


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 Post Posted: Thu Mar 24, 2016 8:22 pm 
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:angel
knee_jerk wrote:
I was hoping Biggabit was going to say it's easy..., but he didn't... :cry

For my other bike the tyres are tubed so a little easier to deal with, plus with punctures you really need to be able to fix them yourself whilst out riding. With the road bike I'm not going to go through many tyres (or have punctures hopefully) so I can't really justify buying specific kit to do the balancing etc, though I think I have enough kit already to get the old tyres off & probably the new ones on..

I'm going to make some enquiries to see how much the local places will charge, however if it's as much £20 each then I may do it myself anyway. :evil


It's not easy but then nor is riding a unicycle and I also mastered that last year, I can ride it around forwards and on the spot (Idling) and am now trying to ride it backwards! (Seriously if you'd like a REAL challenge get one they're great fun!!)

The garages around here charge £15 a loose wheel which I guess isn't bad and to be honest if I were more of a 'polisher' I'd gladly part with the money. The thing is I commute 200+ miles a week on my little red Hornet, so when I purchased ta pair of tyres from Oponeo at a very good price I thought rather than hand £30 over to the local stealer to fit I'd purchase some levers and a balancer and give it ago myself. After all if I failed it would be no big deal and I'd simply resell the balancer and levers on Ebay and take the wheels to the local stealer to complete. Well I didn't fail and now have a new 'skill' which means that the next pair of boots I purchase for the Hornet will just cost what I purchase them for :p

The only specialised equipment you need purchase are decent tyre levers (at least 3) and a portable wheel balancer. (Abba do a bead breaker for £64 ! I have their stand but won't be purchasing the bead breaker anytime soon, especially whilst there are other ways of achieving the same result for free.

I fitted the front tyre first and found it fairly 'easy' the rear tyre initially was more problematic due to it's width and stiffness, the beads at 6 0'clock would not stay in the wheel centre recess and would 'seat' making the last section at 12 o'clock impossible to lever on, but once I tie- wrapped the lower beads together so they would sit in the wheels centre recess SUCCESS the last part levered on!

I will take and post some pics showing the car jack, 2 walls and wooden push rod arrangement I used for breaking the rear bead as I realise it sounds very dodgy when written, but in practice it was very effective and a very controlled way of breaking the stubborn bead. I was forced to improvise with what I had at hand when the 'spade method' (which worked well on the front bead) failed on the rear bead even with all my weight on it! :angel

Like I said watch some DIY motorcycle tyre fitting on youtube as there are many DIY methods....I watched loads before I attempted mine :p

P.s. I do all my own maintenance where ever possible, I fitted the current chain and sprockets, tyres, brake pads, rear lines, ect and yes it does save money but also it gives you an immense sense of achievement riding around on YOUR WORK.

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 Post Posted: Tue Jun 07, 2016 2:03 am 
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Biggabit wrote:
:angel
knee_jerk wrote:
I was hoping Biggabit was going to say it's easy..., but he didn't... :cry

For my other bike the tyres are tubed so a little easier to deal with, plus with punctures you really need to be able to fix them yourself whilst out riding. With the road bike I'm not going to go through many tyres (or have punctures hopefully) so I can't really justify buying specific kit to do the balancing etc, though I think I have enough kit already to get the old tyres off & probably the new ones on..

I'm going to make some enquiries to see how much the local places will charge, however if it's as much £20 each then I may do it myself anyway. :evil


It's not easy but then nor is riding a unicycle and I also mastered that last year, I can ride it around forwards and on the spot (Idling) and am now trying to ride it backwards! (Seriously if you'd like a REAL challenge get one they're great fun!!)

The garages around here charge £15 a loose wheel which I guess isn't bad and to be honest if I were more of a 'polisher' I'd gladly part with the money. The thing is I commute 200+ miles a week on my little red Hornet, so when I purchased ta pair of tyres from Oponeo at a very good price I thought rather than hand £30 over to the local stealer to fit I'd purchase some levers and a balancer and give it ago myself. After all if I failed it would be no big deal and I'd simply resell the balancer and levers on Ebay and take the wheels to the local stealer to complete. Well I didn't fail and now have a new 'skill' which means that the next pair of boots I purchase for the Hornet will just cost what I purchase them for :p

The only specialised equipment you need purchase are decent tyre levers (at least 3) and a portable wheel balancer. (Abba do a bead breaker for £64 ! I have their stand but won't be purchasing the bead breaker anytime soon, especially whilst there are other ways of achieving the same result for free.

I fitted the front tyre first and found it fairly 'easy' the rear tyre initially was more problematic due to it's width and stiffness, the beads at 6 0'clock would not stay in the wheel centre recess and would 'seat' making the last section at 12 o'clock impossible to lever on, but once I tie- wrapped the lower beads together so they would sit in the wheels centre recess SUCCESS the last part levered on!

I will take and post some pics showing the car jack, 2 walls and wooden push rod arrangement I used for breaking the rear bead as I realise it sounds very dodgy when written, but in practice it was very effective and a very controlled way of breaking the stubborn bead. I was forced to improvise with what I had at hand when the 'spade method' (which worked well on the front bead) failed on the rear bead even with all my weight on it! :angel

Like I said watch some DIY motorcycle tyre fitting on youtube as there are many DIY methods....I watched loads before I attempted mine :p

P.s. I do all my own maintenance where ever possible, I fitted the current chain and sprockets, tyres, brake pads, rear lines, ect and yes it does save money but also it gives you an immense sense of achievement riding around on YOUR WORK.

Nice work mate. I have just brought a bead breaker and will try it myself next time I Need tyres


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 Post Posted: Tue Jun 07, 2016 7:26 pm 
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bud wrote:
Nice work mate. I have just brought a bead breaker and will try it myself next time I Need tyres


Cheers M8 can't beat that financial and mental reward by doing it yourself :)

It's really not that difficult but does require a common sense approach, some simple prepping and the implementation of those tips and tricks mentioned above.

When the time comes please let us know 'in this thread' how you got on. :clap

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 Post Posted: Fri May 26, 2017 6:31 pm 
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Double post delete.

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Last edited by Biggabit on Fri May 26, 2017 6:51 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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 Post Posted: Fri May 26, 2017 6:31 pm 
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DIY fitted my 3rd tyre today (another rear) :)

Before setting off one morning i noticed that the rear tyre had lost pressure it was down to 10 PSI :halt When i attempted to re-inflate the tyre it became obvious the valve stem had split around its base! Hiss Hiss :Pray Not sure how this could have happened but from now on i'l be fitting a fresh valve stem with every tyre fit. 8o (If you take them to a garage insist they do as they don't always)

The tyre though good for a while longer had developed the usual flat section so since the wheel and tyre would have to come off to replace the valve stem i decided to fit a new tyre at the same time.

Image
Purchased some valve stems but made my own stem puller by using a metal dust cap, bent nail and coach nut and bolt. Drilled hole in top of cap passed a nail (like shown) through it then bent the end. (BTW They don't cost much to buy.)

After leaving the tyre to warm up in the sun for an hour, i used two 12 inch levers, rim protectors and bits of a bar of soap dissolved in warm water to fit it.
Image
The first side is simple and goes on with hand pressure alone, the second side goes on half way by hand then it's a just case of kneeling on the tyre so the beads stay in the wheel centre recess and going round with the levers in small increments while following the bead with your knees. (No zip ties required this time)

I couldn't believe how easy this tyre went on, it took literately 5 mins tops! It took longer to remove that annoying foil backed sticker and sticky glue prior to balancing. :Bang

And then it just got better...

Before taking the wheel to the local BP garage to seat the bead using the 'inflate from flat' option (like i did last time) i thought I'd have a go at seating the bead using my Aldi Workzone foot pump.

PING!! PING!!

I doubt that will work again (especially on a rear tyre) but today it did ! :hb
Image
Aldi special buy foot pump/bead seater?

:hat

P.s. If you're thinking of having ago at fitting your own tyres video shows the basic technique required, though don't use those crappy blue rim protectors! and don't dismount the tyre or lever the last part on without a rim protector like he did... !

Not sure why he did that maybe he rushed it for video.

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 Post Posted: Tue May 30, 2017 2:04 am 
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Your getting good at this now then :clap


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 Post Posted: Tue May 30, 2017 10:35 am 
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Hornet Lord

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This is one of those things I've never considered doing myself as its cheap enough at a mechanics (12.50 loose wheel)

I might have a crack at it the next time round though, mainly to learn.

Oh and also, heard of a thing a while ago..
Stick a piece of paper with your details on the rim when you change the tyre. That way, if it ever gets stolen (and sold on) and goes in somewhere for a tyre change, the mechanic will see and can alert the owner/appropriate people.
Obviously, theres a lot that can fail with that but just a thing people can do if they want to.

I can't see myself selling my bike (wouldn't get anything for it anyway) so might do it when I change the tyre next.


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 Post Posted: Tue May 30, 2017 6:21 pm 
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bud wrote:
Your getting good at this now then :clap

Thanks, i think it went so well due to having the confidence and 'hands on' experience from the previous tyre changes. Once you've done one you know what's required. Having said that i still watched some tyre fitting videos on YouTube for inspiration and more importantly read this old thread of mine. It's why i posted this tyre fitment so i can read about 'how well it went' next time.

anz243k wrote:
This is one of those things I've never considered doing myself as its cheap enough at a mechanics (12.50 loose wheel)

I might have a crack at it the next time round though, mainly to learn.


£15 a wheel around these parts which i know isn't a lot but a potential additional £30 on top of that great tyre deal you found on line. :Bang

If you do give it ago please let us know how you get on, usually the hardest part is breaking the bead of the tyre being removed (though my bead breaking method makes easy work of it) As for fitting the new tyre, if done correctly you'l be surprised how little lever force is required.

The trouble i have is... now i know i can do it myself handing over £15 / £3O is even harder to do.

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 Post Posted: Wed May 31, 2017 9:47 am 
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[quote="Biggabit"
If you do give it ago please let us know how you get on, usually the hardest part is breaking the bead of the tyre being removed (though my bead breaking method makes easy work of it)[/quote]
When a mate and I changed the tyres on a scooter, we used his bike's sidestand.

Basically, lift the bike off the stand, slide the wheel under the sidestand so that the stand rests as close to the bead as possible without touching the wheel and then lean the bike over onto the sidestand. The weight of the bike concentrated on the sidestand was enough to break the bead. Obv, this is on a scooter tyre. Bigger wheels might be harder.


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 Post Posted: Wed May 31, 2017 11:24 am 
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I recently needed a new rear tyre on my strom... was going to do it myself but couldn't find a cheap enough balancer at that time (on fleabay).
Decided to test a local bike shop to see how quick he'd do it, and would it be a good job.

It was next day service, £12 fitting & balancing including old tyre disposal, all good, no rim damage.
My local tip charges £3.90 to dispose of a tyre, so that makes it effectively £8.10 for fitting & balancing... no brainer really.
I can't see myself needing many tyres a year, likely not more than 1 tyre a year on my road bikes as my annual mileage is low.. so have decided not to invest in the kit.
I still do my own trail bike tyres though, so I'm not totally useless. :)


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 Post Posted: Mon Jul 03, 2017 10:47 am 
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Ordered a few bits over the weekend to do my front tyre. Checked ebay and found a load of part worns on there. Worked out price per mm depth and the part worns actually worked out cheaper. Also, figured a part worn fornt would wear out same time/close to when my rear wears out and can change as a set.

My local mechanic also more than doubled his tyre fitting prices so thought I'd have a crack at it myself with a part worn..

Ordered a Blacks balancer shaft thingy thats linked higher up, rim protectors and weights. Going to borrow a set of tyre levers and have a crack when all the bits arrive.


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 Post Posted: Mon Jul 03, 2017 6:06 pm 
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Just remember excessive force is not required, so stop if it demands it or looks impossible. (You're doing something wrong and will damage something)

The trick to levering the last part of the tyre on (position 12 O'clock) is to ensure that the beads of the tyre (both beads) @ position 6 O'clock have not 'seated' but are sitting in the wheel's centre recess. This will give you the slack required to lever the last section on.

Warm tyre, beads in recess, lube and levering small sections on at a time... nibble rather than bite. :angel

Hope it all goes well for you :)


P.s. Consider changing your they're cheap as chips and simple to fit.

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 Post Posted: Mon Jul 03, 2017 6:42 pm 
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Forgot to mention....

Whilst the tyre is off, take the time to thoroughly clean the rim where the tyre seats using a scotch brite pad and soap. Many tyre fitters don't bother, but bits of rubber and shite left behind from the old tyre can cause a slow leak if not cleaned off, by doing it yourself you can make sure the job is done right.

Since fitting my own tyres none of my wheels loose pressure.

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 Post Posted: Mon Jul 03, 2017 7:33 pm 
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Ok - I just removed my old tyres and I had a right mare!

First time I've done this and the reason (I'm hoping) it was such a tough job is that the tyres were as hard as rock as a result of not having moved (along with the rest of the bike) for the last four years - they were probably already three years old before the bike conked out which is a total of seven years.

I collected all the necessary tools and kit because I wanted the process to be as painless as possible (famous last words) - tools included:

Bead breaker tool (I managed to pick this up for 16 quid)

Set of 3 tyre levers and rim protectors (cheap as chips)

Tyre mounting/unmounting paste to help the bead pop off/on (big tub for £3.35 off Amazon)

'Bead Depressor Drop Centre Tool' to pull the bead opposite the bead you are levering off into the well of the wheel (cheap off ebay).

Hair Dryer to heat up rubber to make it more pliable.

Got to work with the bead breaker, levers, paste, centre tool etc and it was really tough - again I'm hoping this was because it was a very old tyre which had become much harder than a tyre which had seen recent use - I was using a lot of force with the levers but obviously I was mindful not to use too much and damage the wheel rim - bead was going nowhere so I used more force - at this point my rim protectors started to split and disintegrate! :help - this resulted in a couple of minor dings in the rim (I managed to smooth them out with a bit of light sanding) - I finally managed to pop the bead and then tried to get the opposite bead off - I though this would be easy compared to the first bead but it turned out to be an even more awkward job than the first one.

At this point I took a break and went on the net where a bit of googling turned up some advice from other people who had encountered similar problems with old, hardened tyres - so on their advice I got the Stanley knife out and cut the wheels out of the tyres!!!! :finger

I'm really, really hoping that in future when I'm fitting new tyres or removing tyres which are due to be changed the tyres will be much more pliable than these rock hard bastards . . . :(

Pics:
Bead breaker tool - can be picked up quite cheap if you look around.
ImageBEAD BREAKER TOOL by Hoon Ninetyeight, on Flickr
Tyre mount/unmount paste
ImageTYRE PASTE by Hoon Ninetyeight, on Flickr
Hair dryer to warm the rubber, tyre levers and bead drop centre tool
ImageREAR TYRE UNMOUNT 2 by Hoon Ninetyeight, on Flickr
Bead drop centre tool - very useful if not essential tool for tyre removal.
ImageBEAD DEPRESSOR DROP CENTRE TOOL by Hoon Ninetyeight, on Flickr
Admiited defeat and just cut the bastards out
ImageFRONT REAR CUT OUT by Hoon Ninetyeight, on Flickr


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 Post Posted: Mon Jul 03, 2017 9:54 pm 
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Well that's one way of getting them off :clap

The bead breaker looks the part.... does it work then? (Might invest in one)

Those levers look very narrow in section (might just be the pictures) take care they don't damage the new tyre/bead or wheel rim. They shouldn't be destroying the rim protectors.

The 3 tyres I've fitted so far were all fitted in hot weather, two were left in a hot car and the most recent in direct sunlight for an hour or so. (No different than the bike being left in the sun) The tyres were warm throughout, i wonder whether a hair drier could achieve the same depth of heat.

Mind you having said that i never heated the tyres that were coming off. (bead breaking aside, taking them off was the easy part)

Maybe it was like you said because of old hard rubber and hopefully you won't struggle so much with fitting the new tyres.

All the best.

P.s. Fit a new valve stems, their rubber will most likely be older and harder than the tyres.

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 Post Posted: Tue Jul 04, 2017 9:24 am 
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Hornet Lord
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Location: Somerset
Biggabit wrote:
i wonder whether a hair drier could achieve the same depth of heat.


Yeh, I wonder that too.
I once setup 2 tyres above an electric convection heater in a summer house (shed really). 2 garden chairs back to back, tyres resting on the top with a thick blanket over them and the heater below. Left them for a hour or so. Result was lovely warm tyres ready to fit, and it was a noticeable easier job.
This was done in winter btw. In summer the parcel shelf of a car (in the sun) will work fine.


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 Post Posted: Tue Jul 04, 2017 10:01 am 
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Hornet Lord
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Quote:
The bead breaker looks the part.... does it work then? (Might invest in one)


Yep - it makes breaking the bead easy - have a look on ebay - you shouldn't pay more than 30 quid tops and you might find one cheaper.

Quote:
Those levers look very narrow in section (might just be the pictures) take care they don't damage the new tyre/bead or wheel rim. They shouldn't be destroying the rim protectors.


Yeah - noted - I'm going to look for some larger broader levers.

Quote:
i wonder whether a hair drier could achieve the same depth of heat.


The hair dryer heats up the tyre sufffciently in the immediate area you are working in - a couple of minutes on full power and you can smell the hot rubber - I use the hair dryer all the time for removing carb/throttle body rubbers, fuel lines and coolant hoses etc and it works a treat - essential if you are working on the bike in winter.

Quote:
Maybe it was like you said because of old hard rubber


Yep - these tyres were rock hard - almost fossilised after sitting immobile on the wheel for four years - the following explains the issue:

The essential problem here is outgassing: as the rubber ages it loses volatile oils through the outer layers of the tire. Normally, the flexing motion of the tire tends to keep the oils evenly distributed throughout the rubber, so that outgassing is a minor issue.

But when tires are stored for long periods of time without that flexing motion, outgassing must be kept to​ a minimum to avoid drying out the outer layers of rubber to the point that they begin to crack instead of flexing.


Quote:
P.s. Fit a new valve stems, their rubber will most likely be older and harder than the tyres.


Thanks - will do. :D


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 Post Posted: Sun Aug 27, 2017 4:55 pm 
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Fitted tyre number four today... a new front :)

Usual procedure and taking full advantage of a lovely hot day, I also managed to seat the bead with my Aldi foot pump again !

Image
Tyre number four fitted. Disks were left in place this time with no problems.

Having had one fail, these days i always fit a new valve stem with each tyre change.

Image
Valves stems are easily fitted using my home made valve puller.

Now for a couple of well deserved :Beer

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